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    1792        {225}  2017

    Please join us for a historic day of commemoration and celebration in

    the birthplace of the Commonwealth on June 1, 2017

    Constitution Square Historic Site 105 East Walnut St Danville, KY 

    859-236-7794 info@betterindanville.com

    Schedule of Events 

    11:00 AM Music by Doc Shiba’s Old-Time String Band inspired by the rural string bands of the 1930s

    Lydia Graham  "My Old Kentucky Home" 

    Friends of Fort Harrod Rifle Salute

             Toast the Commonwealth of Kentucky

              Singing of Happy Birthday 

           Unveiling of African American Business District Exhibit

    10:00 AM - 3:00 PM  Living History Exhibit 

                        Open House in the historic building Fishers Row 1,2, Watts Bell and Grayson's Tavern

    Art Exhibit in McKinney Conference Center

    Historic Downtown  Danville Walking Tour

    Free tours  Ephraim McDowell House 

    Downtown Specials and Festivities

    Kick off for Great American Brass Band Festival (June 1-4)

    http://www.gabbf.org/new/

    Learn more about celebrations around Kentucky http://www.ky225.com/



    So you know:

    Constitution Square State Historic Site is the birthplace of Kentucky's statehood. In 1776, Kentucky was a frontier and a county of Virginia. The Wilderness Road, blazed by Daniel Boone, led pioneers through the Cumberland Gap and into Central Kentucky. Danville's prominent location on the Wilderness Road became a crossroad for early settlers, and a center of political activity. By 1785, Danville was chosen as Kentucky's first seat of government; and a meetinghouse, courthouse and jail were built to administer the growing territory. Still bound to Virginia laws, several Danville citizens formed the Political Club that recognized the need for a convention to discuss statehood.

    Between 1784-1792, ten constitutional conventions took place. In 1790, Kentucky delegates accepted Virginia's terms for separation, and the state constitution was drafted at the final convention in April 1792. Shortly thereafter, on June 1, 1792, Kentucky became the fifteenth state in the union.